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Cars.com put together a very thorough article that breaks down the trim levels of the Kia Telluride and Hyundai Palisade. It does a great job at showing what the differences are for two SUVs that are closely connected.

Here's the link: https://www.cars.com/articles/hyundai-palisade-vs-kia-telluride-a-trim-by-trim-throwdown-408534/

Telluride LX ($32,785) Vs. Palisade SE ($32,645)
Base trim levels for each vehicle are similarly equipped. Both come with second-row bench seats, 8-inch multimedia screens with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, 18-inch alloy wheels, manual air conditioning and five USB ports in the cabin's first two rows.

Both also come with a robust set of standard safety features: adaptive cruise control down to a stop, automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane-centering steering, rear parking sensors and a trailer stability system.

A few noticeable differences exist, and they favor the Telluride. The Kia comes with imitation leather seating surfaces instead of the Palisade's cloth upholstery, plus standard keyless access with push-button start. But the bigger gap is on safety features, where the Telluride has a safe-exit system and blind spot warning with rear cross-traffic alert as standard, all of which aren't in the Palisade until you move up to the SEL. This gives the Telluride a leg up at the bottom end.

Telluride S ($35,085) Vs. Palisade SEL ($34,595)
The Telluride S and Palisade SEL are another pair of trims closely matched in price and features. Both move from a second-row bench to standard captain's chairs (though they allow you to return to the bench if you want more seats). They keep the standard-size touchscreens from the base models and add heated front seats, a power driver's seat and roof rails.

The Palisade catches up here on other features, adding push-button start and a few other features to bring it nearly square with the Telluride. That's almost, because the Telluride S gets a standard single-pane moonroof, which runs another $900 on the Palisade. The Palisade, meanwhile, swaps manual climate dials for tri-zone automatic control; the Telluride stays manual until you move up to the EX. If you lean toward either vehicle at this point, just roll with it: The value proposition is essentially equal.

Telluride EX ($38,185) Vs. Palisade SEL With Options ($41,345)
Move up to the EX, and a big jump in equipment transforms the Telluride into a premium product. The higher trim adds leather seats, a larger touchscreen (10.25 inches), two third-row USB charging ports, a wireless charger, a hands-free power liftgate and ventilated front seats.

For the Palisade to even the disparity, you'd need to add four options packages: Drive Guidance ($1,250), a Convenience Package ($2,200), a Premium Package ($2,400) and of course a moonroof ($900). That bumps up the price of the Palisade to over $3,000 more than the Telluride to add those previously mentioned features. However, those packages add some features you don't get in the Telluride EX: front parking sensors, heated second-row seats, a power-folding third row, heated steering wheel, 7-inch virtual gauge display, self-leveling rear suspension and a 115-volt household outlet. Some of those can be had in the Telluride's top trim level, the SX, which is only about $1,000 more at this point. Still, the suspension, heated second-row seats and household outlet remain optional on the SX.

If you wanted to bump off the Premium Package to make most of the difference back, you'd lose the leather seats, heated second-row and power-folding third row.

Telluride SX With Options ($47,380) Vs. Palisade Limited ($45,795)
The Palisade strikes back at the top end with a couple features the Telluride doesn't offer: a power-folding third row and a 12.3-inch digital display in the instrument cluster.

The Palisade also adds the features mentioned in the previous section, along with Nappa leather, a 360-degree camera system, ventilated second-row seats and dual sunroofs. To match these features in the Telluride SX, which starts at , it means adding the Towing Package ($795) and the SX Prestige Package. The latter runs $2,000 but requires AWD, which is another $2,000.

Adding AWD to the Palisade Limited bumps it up to , or about $100 more than the Telluride SX with options. But given that the Palisade offers that unique screen and powered third row, that seems a bargain. We found the Palisade's unique virtual instrument panel a highlight, as it's easy to customize and well-suited for displaying important information. Advantage Palisade.
 

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You can add this Telluride/Palisade comparison by Motor Trend to the list as well.

https://www.motortrend.com/cars/kia...sade-vs-2020-kia-telluride-comparison-review/

Describing The Vibe
At this point we've laid out how damningly similar these vehicles are-how to decide a winner? Picking by measurable metrics would be pointless. It's going to come down to those car geek sensibilities we all have to some degree.

First, we concede to the better styling of the Telluride-it's crisper, cleaner, and will remain a looker years down the line. The Palisade's exterior aesthetics are questionable today, which doesn't bode well for its long-term outlook.

Then there's the way each makes you feel. With its slightly higher seating position, the Palisade's ambiance is authoritative in traffic. But glancing around the interior, and seeing the pudgy body in the rearview mirrors, it comes across as something of a lifted minivan-in other words, not particularly cool.

Conversely, the Telluride's lower driver's seat makes it seem closer to the road. Sight lines are still elevated, but it feels more like a high-roofed wagon than a traditional SUV. Plus, that buff body and suave interior remain enjoyable on every drive. The Telluride is simply the cooler of the two, and the one we'd prefer to hit the streets in.

With respect to Hyundai for creating an objectively excellent near-luxury three-row SUV, the Kia Telluride ekes ahead on the subjective, and is the winner of this comparison.
 

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The base Palisade is marginally the bargain option. As noted above, it does not have blind spot detection or the imitation leather seating included in the base Telluride. But those additions come at a price:

- The base Telluride is $140 more expensive.
- AWD in the Telluride is $300 more expensive.
- If you want a red vehicle, the Telluride's Sangria is a $385 option whereas the Palisade's Sierra Burgundy is at no additional charge.

A couple of general observations not specific to base models:

Palisades are built in South Korea; Tellurides are built in West Point, Georgia.

As for styling, to me the most stiking difference is in profile with the differences in pillar treatments. The Palisade has a fat C pillar and nearly invisible D pillar that curves around the back giving it a larger rear side window (and presumably better rear visibility which helps without blindspot detection in the base model), more of a Chevy Traverse/wagon look to it. Conversely, the Telluride has a thiner C pillar and a fatter D pillar which gives it a more aggressive and more clearly defined two-box look. Compare and contrast below:

1573063652499.png

1573063965426.png
 

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Blind spot detection is worth more than the difference IMO, can't imagine why Hyundai would put out a vehicle of this stature without it.
 

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Blind spot detection is worth more than the difference IMO, can't imagine why Hyundai would put out a vehicle of this stature without it.
I agree. In my opinion it's the most important of the electronic safety features.

I wonder if the Korean Hyundai has a slightly higher manufacturer cost than the Kia out of Georgia once shipping and tariffs are layered on resulting in shaving off a couple of expensive features then cutting the cost slighly to make it look like a trade-off.
 

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I agree. In my opinion it's the most important of the electronic safety features.

I wonder if the Korean Hyundai has a slightly higher manufacturer cost than the Kia out of Georgia once shipping and tariffs are layered on resulting in shaving off a couple of expensive features then cutting the cost slighly to make it look like a trade-off.
That's a good point I haven't thought of.
 
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